Infant Nutrition Council of America Recommendations for B-24 Dietary Guidelines

1. Infant Formula
Experts agree on the benefits of breastfeeding. For infants who do not receive human breast milk, iron-fortified infant formula is the only alternative that provides the right mix of nutrients your baby needs to grow and develop. Homemade infant formula is not recommended due to potential inadequate nutrition and risks of foodborne illness.

2. Young Infant Nutrition
The only two acceptable infant feeding options during the first four to six months of life are breast milk and commercial infant formula. Infants should continue to receive breast milk and/or infant formula throughout the first year as appropriate complementary foods are introduced when the infant is developmentally ready and a
wide variety of foods continue to be introduced to provide the nutrients for the infant’s growth, development and good health.

Infants should only consume breast milk and commercial infant formula until appropriate complementary foods are introduced between four and six months, based on the infant’s rate of development. Appropriate complementary foods should continue to be introduced to provide the nutrients for the infant’s growth, development and good health.

3. Milk introduction
Cow’s milk should not be introduced before 12 months of age. After 12 months of age, young children should consume full-fat milk. Reduced fat milk is not recommended before 2 years of age. Unpasteurized cow or goat milk (raw milk) should never be offered due to the risk of food-borne illness. Nondairy milk beverages vary in their nutritional profiles and should be carefully considered if they are chosen for introduction to infants because the risk of allergic response is not well characterized.

4. Complementary Food Introduction
Appropriate complementary foods should be introduced based on the infant’s rate of development, typically between the ages of 4 and 6 months. Consumption of breast milk or iron-fortified formula, along with age-appropriate solid foods, during the first 12 months of life allows for more balanced nutrition.

5. Nutrient fortification
Appropriate complementary foods should be rich in nutrients including iron, vitamin D, and calcium while not exceeding recommended amounts of sugar, sodium, and
saturated fat.